Self-medication Practices among Medical and Non-medical Students of Siddharthanagar, Nepal during COVID-19 Pandemic.

Authors

  • Anjan Palikhey Universal College of Medical Sciences
  • Amit Kumar Shrivastava Universal College of Medical Sciences
  • Laxmi Shrestha Universal College of Medical Sciences
  • Shanti Gurung Universal College of Medical Sciences
  • Chandrajeet Kumar Yadav Universal College of Medical Sciences
  • Manoj Pandit Universal College of Medical Sciences
  • Jharana Shrestha Universal College of Medical Sciences

Keywords:

Medical and Non-medical students;Self medication; Web based questionnaire

Abstract

Introduction: Self-medication is an essential component of the health care system that involves using drugs to treat self-diagnosed symptoms without consulting a medical practitioner. In the background of the COVID-19 pandemic, self-medication has increased among the general public, including students. Hence, the present study was undertaken to find the differences between medical and non-medical students regarding the prevalence, pattern, and attitude of self-medication practice.

Methods: A cross-sectional web-based study was executed among medical students and non-medical students of Siddharthanagar, Nepal, between August 2020 and January 2021. A pretested Google linked questionnaire was circulated through the Student Forum on social media to collect the data. Chi-square test was used to compare the two groups.

Results: Of the 519 respondents, 360 (69.4%) practiced self-medication in the last six months. There was a statistically significant difference between medical students and non-medical students (p=0.008). Headache was the most common symptom leading to Self-medication, and the most frequently used drug was Paracetamol. Quick-relief was the most common reason, and the primary source of drugs was pharmacies. 80 (15.4%) students reported using herbal preparation of Giloy (Tinospora cordifolia) followed by vitamin C 18 (3.5%) to increase their immunity for the prevention of COVID-19 infection.

Conclusion: Self-medication practice is common among medical and non-medical undergraduate students of Siddharthanagar, with a significant difference between students in the prevalence, pattern, and attitude. Since self-medication is a sensitive issue, health awareness programs must be initiated at national levels to educate students about its merits and demerits.

 

Author Biographies

Anjan Palikhey, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Pharmacology

Amit Kumar Shrivastava, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Pharmacology

Laxmi Shrestha, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Pharmacology

Shanti Gurung, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Pharmacology

Chandrajeet Kumar Yadav, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Pharmacology

Manoj Pandit, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Pharmacology

Jharana Shrestha, Universal College of Medical Sciences

Department of Biochemistry

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Published

2021-10-12

How to Cite

Palikhey, A., Shrivastava, A. K., Shrestha, L., Gurung, S., Yadav, C. K., Pandit, M., & Shrestha, J. (2021). Self-medication Practices among Medical and Non-medical Students of Siddharthanagar, Nepal during COVID-19 Pandemic. Journal of KIST Medical College, 3(2), 40–48. Retrieved from http://journal.kistmcth.edu.np/index.php/JKISTMC/article/view/121