Breastfeeding in COVID-19: Vaccination and vindication

Authors

  • Jared Robinson Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, MU
  • Indrajit Banerjee Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, MU
  • Alexandra Leclézio Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, MU

Keywords:

Child, Pediatrics, SARS-COV-2, Vaccination, Breast Feeding

Abstract

SARS-CoV-2 has spread internationally and infiltrated every facet of our lives. The novel virus has now globally infected 233,503,524 people and has caused 777,503 deaths. The high prevalence of the virus equates to new factions within the community being infected. The high exposure rates and infections within these factions means that the most vulnerable individuals and members within our society are being exposed to the deadly virus. One such vulnerable group within our society is new-borns and infants whom are born from infected SARS-CoV-2 mothers. It is vital for both the public and scientific community as whole to best understand how to deal with such cases, so as to best safeguard both the life and health of the new-born and the mother.

The lack of data and dearth of research in this sect of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its immunization thereto, coupled with the intense emotional aspect of mothers and their new-borns makes taking an informed decision difficult. It is however evident based on the current findings and research that vaccination during pregnancy and or breastfeeding is agreeable and poses no harm to the baby or mother, unless otherwise contraindicated. The wild-type infection poses a far greater threat to both the lives of the neonate and or mother as compared to the vaccine; as many of the authors and regulatory bodies have stated, the rewards should outweigh the risks in each case. It is therefore advisable for nursing mothers to receive the vaccination and practice strict skin-to-skin sanitary measures when nursing throughout this pandemic, with excessive hygiene measures being put into place when sterilizing the breast pumps and or feeding equipment. The lack of research in this sect calls for further research and study to best safeguard and protect our most vulnerable members in society.

Author Biographies

Jared Robinson, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, MU

Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, Mauritius

Indrajit Banerjee, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, MU

Associate Professor, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, Mauritius

Alexandra Leclézio, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, MU

Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Medical College: Belle Rive, Vacoas-Phoenix, Mauritius

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Published

2022-07-19

How to Cite

Robinson, J. ., Banerjee, I., & Leclézio, A. (2022). Breastfeeding in COVID-19: Vaccination and vindication. Journal of KIST Medical College, 4(7), 54–57. Retrieved from https://journal.kistmcth.edu.np/index.php/JKISTMC/article/view/152